Synapse Support for SFTP Storage

Synapse supports a diverse set of scientific projects through a federated model for storing digital assets – files can be store in a variety of back-end services with aggregation of appropriate metadata and indexing done centrally. While the default Synapse storage location has been (and will continue to be) storing Files uploaded to Synapse in Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), we have recently added support for another type of external storage solution: SFTP servers. Synapse will continue to handle authentication to access the metadata surrounding Files registered and stored on external SFTP servers, however users must have appropriate credentials to download or edit content stored on specific SFTP resources.

In order to support communication with external SFTP storage solutions, we have released new versions of both the R Client (version 1.4-6) on our LRAN as well as the Python Client (version 1.1) on PyPi. Upgrade your clients today in order to enable interactions with SFTP resources.

We are pleased to announce that the first external users to leverage SFTP storage are analysts working with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). As in the Pan Cancer Analysis Working Group (AWG) in 2013, TCGA will continue to leverage Synapse for many of their ongoing collaborative efforts.

We are excited to make SFTP storage available to our users, and envision expanding to other storage solutions in the future.

-The Synapse Team

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About Brian Bot
I am a Principal Scientist working in Computational Oncology at Sage Bionetworks in Seattle, Washington and Community Manager for our technology platforms. Previously, I worked in the Department of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics at the Mayo Clinic for 7 years. This work included 7 years of dealing with cancer clinical trial data as part of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center (MCCC). I have extensive experience in working with clinical and genomic data and have a passion for exploring innovative ways to make science more open and transparent. My current work involves both doing innovative research in computational oncology as well as serving as a bridge between biomedical researchers and technology development. At its heart, this work is driven to re-envision how scientists can ensure reproducibility of their research results and communicate complex science to one another and to the public at large. I have been an invited speaker at a number of national and international events to share my experiences living at the intersection of biomedical research and technology.

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